Apple’s original TV shows reportedly won’t be free — plus $9.99 for HBO, Starz, Showtime

Tomorrow, Apple will unveil its strategy for services in an event that is expected to reveal its Apple News subscription and its television streaming platform. According to a lengthy report from The Wall Street Journal, it sounds like the company has been negotiating with premium channels HBO, Showtime, and Starz to offer a standardized $9.99 monthly subscription each, will reportedly charge $9.99 for its news service, and will likely charge for access to its original content, which had been widely reported that it would make free to Apple users.

Apple is widely expected to unveil its original content efforts tomorrow, and the WSJ says that it will show off footage from some of its forthcoming TV programs at its event, and that sources…

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Source:: The Verge – All Posts

Girl on the Third Floor is a skin-crawling horror movie about home improvement

Welcome to Cheat Sheet, our breakdown-style reviews of festival films, VR previews, and other special-event releases. This review comes from the 2019 SXSW Interactive Festival.

It’s hard finding new ways to haunt a house. And Girl on the Third Floor, a horror film that premiered at 2019’s SXSW Interactive Festival, doesn’t make a point of trying. It hits the classic beats of the genre, largely established by Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House: a protagonist with a troubled past moves into a grand but dilapidated old home with a dark secret, then finds a malevolent force dredging up his personal demons.

Instead of trying to push narrative limits, Girl on the Third Floor uses predictability to generate suspense. It draws the…

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Source:: The Verge – All Posts

AIs are being trained on racist data – and it’s starting to show

Machine learning algorithms process vast quantities of data and spot correlations, trends and anomalies, at levels far beyond even the brightest human mind. But as human intelligence relies on accurate information, so too do machines. Algorithms need training data to learn from. This training data is created, selected, collated and annotated by humans. And therein lies the problem. Bias is a part of life, and something that not a single person on the planet is free from. There are, of course, varying degrees of bias – from the tendency to be drawn towards the familiar, through to the most potent…

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Source:: The Next Web – Technology

The soldier who removed his own bladder stone, and other medical history marvels

A patient receiving dental treatment, circa 1892. There were several cases of "exploding teeth" in the 19th century that remain unexplained to this day.

Enlarge / A patient receiving dental treatment, circa 1892. There were several cases of “exploding teeth” in the 19th century that remain unexplained to this day. (credit: Oxford Science Archive/Getty Images)

While researching his 2017 book on the history of heart surgery, medical journalist Thomas Morris perused hundreds of journals from the 19th century. One day, a headline on the page opposite the one he was reading caught his eye: “sudden protrusion of the whole of the intestines into the scrotum.” It was a bizarre case from the 1820s, involving a laborer run over by a brick-laden cart. The resulting hernia forced his intestines into his scrotum, and yet the laborer made a full recovery.

Once he got over his initial amused revulsion, Morris was struck by the sheer ingenuity displayed by doctors in treating the man’s condition. And he found plenty of other similar bizarre cases as he continued his research, with people surviving truly horrifying injuries—a testament to the resiliency of the human body. “Doctors, even when they had less than a tenth of the knowledge we do today in terms of treating major trauma, could still come up with innovative and ingenious solutions to acute problems,” he said.

Many of the most interesting medical cases Morris uncovered are featured in his hugely entertaining compendium of medical oddities, The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth, and Other Curiosities From the History of Medicine. Regular readers of his blog (tagline: “making you grateful for modern medicine”) will revel in stories about a sword-swallowing sailor, a soldier who removed his own bladder stone, a man with combustible belches, a woman who peed through her nose, and a boy who inhaled a bird’s larynx and started honking like a goose. All are delivered in …read more

Source:: Ars Technica