UCP contributors fined by Alberta election commissioner

The Office of the Election Commissioner has fined a United Conservative Party donor and reprimanded two others for donating money that wasn’t theirs in the wake of the kamikaze candidate scandal.

The election commissioner’s website shows political contributor Darcy McAllister was fined $4,000 on Tuesday for contributing $4,000 to the Jeff Callaway campaign with funds given or furnished by another person. McAllister was also fined $4,000 for providing $4,000 to another individual for the purpose of making contributions to the Callaway campaign during the UCP leadership race.

Maja McAllister and David Ruiz, both labelled as political contributors by the election commissioner, were issued letter of reprimands for contributing $4,000 and $3,000 respectively to Callaway’s campaign with funds given by another person.

In 2017, Jason Kenney squared off against contenders Callaway, former Wildrose Party leader Brian Jean and Doug Schweitzer to successfully become leader of the United Conservative Party.

Former party insiders have accused Kenney’s team of collaborating with Callaway’s campaign to sink Jean’s chances at winning the leadership race. The accusation is that Callaway targeted Jean during debates and media appearances, allowing Kenney to avoid making the attacks himself.

Callaway withdrew from the race just before the vote and endorsed Kenney. They have both denied making a deal.

Over the weekend, leaked emails between staff on the campaigns inflamed the issue.

There are also allegations of other irregular donations to Callaway’s campaign. Alberta election commissioner Lorne Gibson handed an investigation about this to the RCMP, saying its seriousness transcended his purview.

dshort@postmedia.com

…read more

Source:: Edmonton Journal

Investigators say the New Zealand gunman was gearing up for a ‘further attack’ when police captured him

new zealand shooting

Police believe the suspected gunman in the Christchurch, New Zealand, mass shooting was on his way to a third target, New Zealand Police Commissioner Mike Bush said at a press conference on Wednesday, local time.
“We strongly believe we stopped him on the way to a further attack,” Bush said. “So lives were saved.”
Funerals for the victims began on Wednesday at Christchurch’s Memorial Park Cemetery, Reuters reported.
Read INSIDER’s full coverage of the shooting here.

Police believe the suspected gunman in the Christchurch mass shooting was on his way to a third location, New Zealand Police Commissioner Mike Bush said at a press conference on Wednesday local time.

“We strongly believe we stopped him on the way to a further attack,” Bush said. “So lives were saved.”

He declined to state the third location, as to not “traumatize” more people.

On Friday, March 15, a gunman opened fire at two mosques back-to-back in Christchurch, New Zealand, killing 50 people and wounding more than 40 others.

Funerals for the victims began on Wednesday at Christchurch’s Memorial Park Cemetery, Reuters reported.

As of Tuesday night, 21 victims were “formally identified,” Bush said during his press conference. He said he expected that 27 would be “identified by midday.”

Bush said he hoped that the majority would be identified by the end of Wednesday, and he stressed that the identification of the victims was “an absolute priority for family reasons, compassionate reasons, and for cultural reasons.”

In Islam, bodies are usually buried within 24 hours of death.

Bush explained that the process of identifying the bodies was also very important to the prosecution of the suspect, “as correct identification is required as part of the investigation and is necessary to prove a charge of murder.”

The suspect, 28-year-old Brenton Tarrant, who was born in Australia and is a suspected white …read more

Source:: Business Insider

4 portfolio managers have exited asset management giant Nuveen after their funds took a hit in 2018

chile trader bloomberg terminal chart

Four portfolio managers have left $930 billion asset manager Nuveen.
James Diedrich, Harold Goldstein, Mark Traster, and Derek Sadowsky exited three funds with a collective $1.7 billion in assets.
A Nuveen spokesman said: “We routinely evaluate our organization to ensure that we are delivering investment excellence to our clients and align our portfolio management teams accordingly.”

Four portfolio managers have left Nuveen, the $930 billion asset manager, according to a person familiar with the matter.

James Diedrich, Harold Goldstein, Mark Traster, and Derek Sadowsky are no longer leading three equity funds with a collective $1.7 billion in assets, according to filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission on Tuesday.

The source told Business Insider the four had left the firm. The men did not respond to requests for comment.

“We routinely evaluate our organization to ensure that we are delivering investment excellence to our clients and align our portfolio management teams accordingly,” a spokesman for Nuveen said. He could not be reached for further comment.

Nuveen is the investment arm of TIAA.

See more: The CMO of $998 billion asset manager Nuveen explains how the brand is trying to stand out in an increasingly crowded field

For the $484 million Nuveen Mid Cap Growth Opportunities Fund, Gregory Ryan is taking the place of Diedrich and Goldstein, who have been portfolio managers since 2006 and 2005, respectively. That fund returned -8.9% in 2018, while the Russell Midcap Growth Index dropped 4.75%, according to Nuveen’s website.

Ryan is also continuing as portfolio manager for the $106 million Nuveen Small Cap Select Fund, and Jon Loth was added as portfolio manager. Traster, who has been a portfolio manager since 2008, is no longer with the fund. The fund returned -11.06% in 2018, in line with the Russell 2000 Index.

And at the $1.1 …read more

Source:: Business Insider

Top school picks: School boards approve their top school construction wishes

Faced with crammed suburban schools, a fleet of aging buildings and a tsunami of teenagers on the horizon, Edmonton’s public and Catholic school boards topped their new construction wish lists with high schools across the city and new K-9 schools in the southwest.

“High schools are a critical need for us,” Edmonton Catholic school board chairwoman Laura Thibert said Tuesday.

Both school boards approved new priority lists Tuesday, which they send to the provincial government, then cross their fingers for project funding and approval.

The Catholic board’s No. 3 and No. 4 priorities are new $55-million high schools for 1,300 students in both Heritage Valley in the south and Dunluce in Castle Downs.

Meanwhile, at the Edmonton public school board, vice-chairwoman Bridget Stirling said it made her nervous to see the first phase of a $79-million southeast Edmonton high school sitting atop the board’s wish list for the second year in a row.

If the government funded the project tomorrow, it would take until September 2022 to open its doors, said Lorne Parker, assistant superintendent, infrastructure.

“That’s a nerve-racking three years,” Stirling said.

Edmonton Public Schools’ top construction priorities for 2020-2023. All projects are contingent on funding and permission from the provincial government.

With several public high schools already at or over capacity, and the number of young Edmontonians expected to continue to grow, the school district foresees having 4,680 more teens than high school spaces by 2025.

A similar report to the Edmonton Catholic board says its high schools will be full by 2023. Mother Margaret Mary High School in the southwest will be oversubscribed by 2022, the district projects, and the north side’s Archbishop O’Leary is at 104 per cent capacity now.

Pressure points in suburbs

Although 16 new elementary and junior high schools opened in Edmonton during …read more

Source:: Edmonton Journal