Boulder to ticket crosswalk users who fail to activate lights

Boulder police officers will step up enforcement next week of the city’s crosswalk ordinances, including ticketing people who fail to activate flashing lights at intersections.

The enforcement is part of the city’s Heads Up Boulder campaign to educate residents about crosswalk safety.

“The Heads Up Boulder campaign is an opportunity to remind the community that pedestrian and bicyclist safety is a top priority,” Boulder police Chief Greg Testa said in a statement. “Collision statistics show crosswalks can be surprisingly dangerous, and all road users need to exercise caution and awareness of others to make us all safer.”

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Police will enforce the ordinance that requires pedestrians and bicyclists to activate the flashing lights at crosswalks before entering the road. Failing to do so can result in a $50 fine.

Police also will make sure cyclists slow down to 8 mph at crosswalks and that vehicles stop for crossing pedestrians and cyclists.

Read the full story at DailyCamera.com.

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Source:: The Denver Post

‘Strong possibility’ lit cigarette involved in devastating Lafayette Chamber of Commerce fire

LAFAYETTE — A fire that devastated a restaurant and the city’s Chamber of Commerce building last week may have started because of a lit cigarette, a fire official said Wednesday.

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The raging three-alarm blaze destroyed nine businesses when it roared through 100 Lafayette Circle on July 13, including La Finestra restaurant. Fire investigators have determined the blaze began there.

“We are certain that it began on the outside patio of the restaurant,” Robert Marshall, a fire marshal with the Contra Costa Fire Protection District, said. “We are looking at the ‘how’ aspect of it more today.”

Investigators are looking at the “strong possibility” that a lit cigarette may have come into play and were focused on that aspect of the investigation Wednesday, Marshall said.

“We don’t think it was anything intentional,” he said. “Was it related to a cigarette? That’s where we’re looking closely.”

The fire roared high into the air, singing the trunk of a 40-foot tree in the parking lot of the building and sending embers blocks away. People as far away as East Contra Costa County could see the smoke amid the morning darkness, and city residents two miles away could smell it.

Officials estimated the damages to the building and its businesses at $1.1 million.

An apartment complex adjacent to the restaurant’s parking lot received a …read more

Source:: The Mercury News

‘Strong possibility’ lit cigarette involved in devastating Lafayette Chamber of Commerce fire

LAFAYETTE — A fire that devastated a restaurant and the city’s Chamber of Commerce building last week may have started because of a lit cigarette, a fire official said Wednesday.

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Fire badly damages East Oakland market

Wildfires in Brentwood, Antioch burn more than 30 acres

Three-alarm fire in Bay Point leaves 13 displaced

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The raging three-alarm blaze destroyed nine businesses when it roared through 100 Lafayette Circle on July 13, including La Finestra restaurant. Fire investigators have determined the blaze began there.

“We are certain that it began on the outside patio of the restaurant,” Robert Marshall, a fire marshal with the Contra Costa Fire Protection District, said. “We are looking at the ‘how’ aspect of it more today.”

Investigators are looking at the “strong possibility” that a lit cigarette may have come into play and were focused on that aspect of the investigation Wednesday, Marshall said.

“We don’t think it was anything intentional,” he said. “Was it related to a cigarette? That’s where we’re looking closely.”

The fire roared high into the air, singing the trunk of a 40-foot tree in the parking lot of the building and sending embers blocks away. People as far away as East Contra Costa County could see the smoke amid the morning darkness, and city residents two miles away could smell it.

Officials estimated the damages to the building and its businesses at $1.1 million.

An apartment complex adjacent to the restaurant’s parking lot received a …read more

Source:: The Mercury News