Ancestry’s DNA test has traced the family histories of more than 15 million people. Now, the genealogy giant plans to get into healthcare.

August 13, 2019

Margo Geogriadis

Genealogy giant Ancestry is planning to get into health in a big way, according to the company’s CEO and a review of job postings.
The company has historically avoided healthcare, even as personal genetics companies like 23andMe have made it a key part of their businesses.
“The possibilities in consumer genomics to help really shift to individualized medicine, the opportunities are just endless,” CEO Margo Georgiadis said in an interview.
Click here for more BI Prime stories.

Ancestry, the family history website, is preparing for a big move into healthcare, an area the 36-year-old firm has largely avoided.

Business Insider has learned that the company has been recruiting for a health team, as the private-equity owned firm prepares for a move that could put it in competition with 23andMe. Ancestry’s CEO said the firm’s goal is to create a product that gives a holistic view of an individual’s health, similar to the company’s family trees. So far, the company has yet to announce anything official.

“When we think about not just the potential of the core business enabled by technology but what you do everyday, the possibilities in consumer genomics to help really shift to individualized medicine, the opportunities are just endless,” CEO Margo Georgiadis said in an interview.

Ancestry’s health push is still in its early days, and it’s unclear exactly what health products the company will offer. Consumer genetic tests for health, offered by companies like 23andMe, have progressed rapidly. Users can now see if they have predispositions for certain diseases, including breast cancer, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s disease.

Ancestry’s current DNA test, which maps out your genetic roots going back generations, has been growing quickly, since launching in 2012. In 2015, the company hit 1 million people tested and in May of this year the company said it’s run tests …read more

Source:: Business Insider

(Visited 2 times, 1 visits today)