Archaeologists find mysterious, 4,000-year-old dog sacrifices in Russia

A map of the area on the northern Russian steppes where the sacrificial dogs were found. The Krasnosamarskoe settlement was a tiny ritual center, part of the larger Indo-European Srubnaya culture in the late Bronze Age.

A map of the area on the northern Russian steppes where the sacrificial dogs were found. The Krasnosamarskoe settlement was a tiny ritual center, part of the larger Indo-European Srubnaya culture in the late Bronze Age. (credit: Journal of Anthropological Archaeology)

4,000 years ago in the northern steppes of Eurasia, in the shadow of the Ural Mountains, a tiny settlement stood on a natural terrace overlooking the Samara River. In the late twentieth century, a group of archaeologists excavated the remains of two or three structures that once stood here, surrounded by green fields where sheep and cattle grazed. But the researchers quickly discovered this was no ordinary settlement. Unusual burials and the charred remains of almost fifty dogs suggested this place was a ritual center for at least 100 years.

Hartwick College anthropologist David Anthony and his colleagues have excavated for several years at the site, called Krasnosamarskoe, and have wondered since that time what kind of rituals would have left this particular set of remains behind. Anthony and his Hartwick College colleague Dorcas Brown offer some ideas in a paper published recently in the Journal of Anthropological Archaeology.

The people who lived at Krasnosamarskoe were part of an Indo-European cultural group called Srubnaya, with Bronze Age technology. The Srubnaya lived in settlements year-round, but were not farmers. They kept animals, hunted for wild game, and gathered plants to eat opportunistically. Like many Indo-European peoples, they did not have what modern people would call an organized religion. But as Krasnosamarskoe demonstrates, they certainly had beliefs that were highly spiritual and symbolic. And they engaged in ritualistic practices over many generations.

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Source:: Ars Technica

How to prepare for the cryptocurrency revolution

Blockchain is quickly becoming one of the most anticipated technologies of our time. Much like the early internet, experienced technologists foresee blockchain as a vehicle to drive society forward. Implementations of secure, decentralized systems can empower us to conquer organizational issues of trust and security that have plagued our society for generations. In effect, we can fundamentally disrupt industries core to our economies and social structure, eliminating inefficiency and human error. One of the most exciting and imminent applications of blockchain is with Bitcoin. Though volatile in nature, Bitcoin represents a not so far away future where payments are secure,…

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Source:: The Next Web – Technology

Pact Coffee founder steps down as CEO as London startup looks to B2B for growth

Pact Coffee, the U.K. subscription service that delivers freshly roasted “specialty coffee” to your door, has seen a change of leadership as the company plans to focus more on the B2B side of its business. After 5 years running Pact, TechCrunch understands that founder Stephen Rapoport has stepped down from his role as CEO and instead will act as Chairman going forward.… Read More …read more

Source:: TechCrunch – Startups

Report: infosec researcher accused of numerous instances of sexual assault

Enlarge / Morgan Marquis-Boire, then a security researcher at the University of Toronto Munk School of Global Affairs’ Citizen Lab, seen here on July 24, 2012. (credit: Jacob Kepler/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

A well-known computer security researcher, Morgan Marquis-Boire, has been publicly accused of sexual assault.

On Sunday, The Verge published a report saying that it had spoken with 10 women across North America and Marquis-Boire’s home country of New Zealand who say that they were assaulted by him in episodes going back years.

A woman that The Verge gave the pseudonym “Lila,” provided The Verge with “both a chat log and a PGP signed and encrypted e-mail from Morgan Marquis-Boire. In the e-mail, he apologizes at great length for a terrible but unspecified wrong. And in the chat log, he explicitly confesses to raping and beating her in the hotel room in Toronto, and also confesses to raping multiple women in New Zealand and Australia.”

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Source:: Ars Technica