Snapshots from two world wars give a Windsor man a window into father and grandfather’s service, trauma

A photo Edsel Pope saved from his service during World War II.

It wasn’t the first time that John Pope had seen the pictures his father took when he was a B-25 tail gunner in the South Pacific during World War II, but when he found them after his mother died last year, they took on new meaning.

“I never really had looked at them that intensely before,” said Pope, 63. “I wished that he had talked to me about them, but he had a little PTSD and he didn’t want to talk” about the war.

Pope brought the pictures, along with a collection documenting his grandfather’s life on the front lines during WW I, back to his home in Windsor, after finding them while going through his mother’s home in Red Cloud, Neb.

The collections depict life during the two greatest military conflicts of the 20th century.

Pope’s father, Edsel, who died in 2002, went into the Army Air Corps after graduating from high school in Red Cloud.

The pictures he brought home from the war were taken between bombing runs, many of them at a base in Puerto Princesa, on Palawan Island in the western Philippines.

Photo courtesy of John Pope

A photo Edsel Pope saved from his service during World War II. Pope served in the United States military during World War II. He brought back dozens of photos from his time overseas, mostly from where he was stationed in the South Pacific.

Photo courtesy of John Pope

A photo Edsel Pope saved from his service during World War II. Pope served in the United States military during World War II. He brought back dozens of photos from his time overseas, mostly from where he was stationed in the South Pacific.

Photo courtesy of John Pope

Staff Sergeant Edsel Pope during World War II at a base in Puerto Princesa, on Palawan Island, in the western Philippines. Pope served …read more

Source:: The Denver Post

Fund manager Q&A: Emerging markets funds

By Alex Veiga, The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Investors have been betting heavily on emerging markets stocks this year, and the strategy appears to be paying off.

The MSCI Emerging Markets Investment Market Index, which covers securities across developing nations, is up nearly 16 percent this year, according to FactSet. Compare that with the Standard & Poor’s 500 index, which is up 7.2 percent.

Fund investors are piling in. Through the first four months of this year, net flows into emerging market U.S. funds totaled $26.17 billion, according to Morningstar. That’s an increase of more than 20 percent from the net flows that went into emerging markets funds in all of 2016.

Why such a focus on emerging markets funds?

David Semple, portfolio manager for the VanEck Emerging Markets Fund (GBFAX), points to a couple of factors: Better-than-expected earnings from companies in developing nations and the prospect of higher short-term interest rates, which traditionally has been a precursor to better growth.

“That underpinning in terms of fundamentals is very positive in terms of the ability to sustain what has been a very good rally so far this year,” Semple says.

His fund focuses on companies in the developing world with potential for growth at a reasonable price, which often means small-cap stocks. It is up 22.5 percent this year, according to FactSet.

Semple spoke with the AP about where emerging market stocks are headed. Answers have been edited for length and clarity.

Q. Is this a good time to get into investing in emerging market funds?

A: Rather than say this is necessarily a good time, I’ll run through four different things people should be looking at.

The first is the dollar. A strongly appreciating dollar is not good for emerging markets. It sucks liquidity out of emerging markets. It reduces earnings and there’s a translation effect of what …read more

Source:: The Denver Post

The maker of Bud Light is investing $2 billion to make its beer ‘more sophisticated’

The world’s largest beer company, which makes Bud Light, Becks and Stella Artois, is investing $2 billion in American brewing operations over the next four years.

Anheuser-Busch, which has been aggressively buying up craft breweries to make up for its flat sales, said the investment is part of an ongoing effort to expand in the United States, where craft beer sales have eclipsed Budweiser sales for four years running.

The money – which includes about $500 million in investments this year – will go toward building new distribution facilities in Los Angeles and Columbus, Ohio, and to improve existing breweries in Houston, St. Louis and Fort Collins. Although the money will not be used to acquire additional craft breweries, executives said it would be used to expand brewing facilities for craft beer brands the company already owns.

“This is a vote of confidence in the future of American brewing,” Joao Castro Neves, president and chief executive of Anheuser-Busch, said.”We are doing our part to make the beer industry more sophisticated, complex and compelling to our consumers.”

The investment comes five months after Belgium-based Anheuser-Busch InBev purchased SABMiller, the maker of Fosters, Miller and Pilsner Urquell. The $107-billion deal brought together the world’s two largest brewers to create a combined company with roughly 500 beer brands and an estimated $55 billion in annual sales.

Now executives are saying it’s time to reassure Americans the company remains focused on the U.S. market, where its customers increasingly are opting for locally produced craft brews over mass-produced brands. “It was important to double-down on the U.S. market after the dust settled from the SABMiller acquisition,” Neves said. “We are starting to see upticks [in sales], but we definitely have not turned the corner yet.”

Neves said the company’s latest investments were not motivated by President Donald Trump’s pro-America business policies …read more

Source:: The Denver Post