The Tough Love Approach to Career Guidance

Internships are often touted as a key to future career success. But working internships can be made infinitely more difficult for students whose parents can’t afford to supplement their living expenses while they build their resume. That’s because many internships remain unpaid. In fact, reports show that of the 61 percent of students who interned during college, over half worked unpaid positions.

Opening up access to internships allows people to tap into the networks and mentors that can set them up for entry-level opportunities. Before a professional relationship evolves into a mentorship, the mentor and mentee need a “genuine” familiarity with each other, so internships can serve as a foundation for that guidance.

Launched last year, Pay Our Interns, a bipartisan nonprofit, recognized the lack of advocates fighting for organizations to pay their interns, especially jobs in the public sector located in hubs like Washington, D.C. and New York. The group wants to change the privilege pipeline that oftens rewards young professionals from wealthy, connected backgrounds and leaves low-income, people of color out of the running for opportunities in their respective fields.

As part of our series on mentorship, “On the Shoulders of Giants,” I spoke with with Pay Our Interns founder, Carlos Mark Vera, to talk about his struggle interning for free as a first-generation college student and who guided him along the way as he explored passions in politics and advocacy. The conversation that follows has been edited for length and clarity.

Elisha Brown: You were an intern in Congress and you have said this about the experience: “I remember walking through the halls of Congress and feeling intimidated and out of place because the only people that looked like me were the custodial workers.” Tell me more about that experience and who you …read more

Source:: The Atlantic – Business

Forbes names Salt Lake City as the best place for young professionals

Those in search of their dream job may want to visit Salt Lake City.

Forbes recently ranked the Beehive State’s capital city as the top city for young professionals. Salt Lake City received the high ranking for its low unemployment rate (3.2 percent) and 2.54 percent job growth, among other factors, like graduate starting salary.

“The city is home to more than 20,000 businesses, with strengths in a varied range of sectors including information technology and gaming, outdoor products, life sciences, health care, finance and manufacturing,” according to Forbes.

Salt Lake City also earned high honors for its cheap rent, which sits at $1,100 for median two-bedroom apartments, Forbes reported.

Forbes based its rankings on six metrics. The median salary for college grades influenced the list the most, according to Forbes.

One surprise — the second-best city for young professionals is Boise, Idaho, according to Forbes. The city has high job growth projections and many adults with degrees, Forbes reported.

at Forbes.

Late last year, Forbes also ranked Salt Lake City as the best city for business for the third-straight year, according to the Deseret News.

…read more

Source:: Deseret News – Moneywise News

Salt Lake City just topped another Forbes list

Those in search of their dream job may want to visit Salt Lake City.

Forbes recently ranked the Beehive State’s capital city as the top city for young professionals. Salt Lake City received the high ranking for its low unemployment rate (3.2 percent) and 2.54 percent job growth, among other factors, like graduate starting salary.

“The city is home to more than 20,000 businesses, with strengths in a varied range of sectors including information technology and gaming, outdoor products, life sciences, health care, finance and manufacturing,” according to Forbes.

Salt Lake City also earned high honors for its cheap rent, which sits at $1,100 for median two-bedroom apartments, Forbes reported.

Forbes based its rankings on six metrics. The median salary for college grades influenced the list the most, according to Forbes.

One surprise — the second-best city for young professionals is Boise, Idaho, according to Forbes. The city has high job growth projections and many adults with degrees, Forbes reported.

at Forbes.

Late last year, Forbes also ranked Salt Lake City as the best city for business for the third-straight year, according to the Deseret News.

…read more

Source:: Deseret News – Moneywise News