Rockies hang on to beat Cardinals, 8-6, take series

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Brendan Rodgers stood at the plate for an extra moment and watched his three-run homer sail deep into the left-field bleachers.

Why not? The Rockies deserved to strut their stuff on a hot Thursday afternoon at Coors Field.

Powered by their six-run seventh inning and a solid start by right-hander German Marquez, they held on to beat the Cardinals, 8-6, to clinch the three-game series.

The Cardinals, in a dogfight with Milwaukee for the National League Central title, came to Colorado riding a seven-game winning streak but were bludgeoned by Rockies hitters in Games 1 and 3.

But nothing comes easy for the Rockies this season. The Cardinals scored three runs in the eighth off of slumping set-up man Alex Colome. Nolan Gordon drew a leadoff walk and MVP candidate Paul Goldschmidt made Colome pay by mashing a two-run homer to left. Former Rockies third baseman Nolan Arenado followed with a solo homer.

Over his last nine appearances, Colome has an ERA of 14.84.

Right-hander Carlos Estevez relieved Colome and put down the Cardinals’ rally. But closer Daniel Bard walked a tightrope in the ninth as the Cardinals loaded the bases and score a run. But Bard closed out the game by striking out Arenado — looking — with men on first and third, for his 24th save.

Colorado’s seventh began innocently enough, with Sam Hilliard and Brian Serven drawing one-out walks off right-hander Jordan Hicks. Genesis Cabrera relieved Hicks and allowed RBI singles by Charlie Blackmon and Jose Iglesias, followed by Rodgers’ 407-foot home run. Ryan McMahon then blasted a solo shot to right, giving Colorado an 8-2 lead.

The Cardinals tested Marquez but he hung tough for six innings and left with the game tied 2-2. The right-hander gave up eight hits, struck out six, and walked one.

St. Louis threatened to blow Marquez off the mound …read more

Source:: The Denver Post

Bears RB David Montgomery, TE Cole Kmet to be ‘fine’ after minor injuries

Kmet (left) and Montgomery (right) have both missed multiple days of practice with unspecified injuries.

AP Photos

Amid a tense week at Halas Hall, there’s one thing about which the Bears can breathe easy: Running back David Montgomery and tight end Cole Kmet are fine.

Both missed practice again Thursday, but coach Matt Eberflus was confident that neither player’s injury was significant.

He said of Montgomery, “He’s going to be fine; he’s going to be back pretty fast,” and then when asked about Kmet, he said, “Same — We expect him to be fine.”

Neither is expected to play in the preseason opener against the Chiefs on Saturday, per Eberflus, but that doesn’t matter much. Both will have plenty of time to recover and re-acclimate before the season opener Sept. 11 against the 49ers.

Both players are important to the Bears for the upcoming season and possibly their future. With few proven playmakers in place around quarterback Justin Fields, the team needs Montgomery and Kmet on the field.

Montgomery led the team with 1,150 yards from scrimmage (849 as a rusher) and seven touchdowns last season, while Kmet was second in receptions (60) and yards (612) to wide receiver Darnell Mooney.

General manager Ryan Poles also needs to know if Montgomery and Kmet are the long-term answers at their positions. Montgomery is in the final year of his rookie contract, and Kmet is signed through 2023. With a windfall of salary-cap space and draft picks coming next year, Poles will spend this season assessing whether he can cross running back and tight end off his shopping list.

…read more

Source:: Chicago Sun Times

Sweeping climate bill pushes American energy to go green

By SETH BORENSTEIN, MATTHEW DALY and MICHAEL PHILLIS

WASHINGTON (AP) — After decades of inaction in the face of escalating natural disasters and sustained global warming, Congress hopes to make clean energy so cheap in all aspects of life that it’s nearly irresistible. The House is poised to pass a transformative bill Friday that would provide the most spending to fight climate change by any one nation ever in a single push.

Friday’s anticipated action comes 34 years after a top scientist grabbed headlines warning Congress about the dangers of global warming. In the decades since, there have been 308 weather disasters that have each cost the nation at least $1 billion, the record for the hottest year has been broken 10 times and wildfires have burned an area larger than Texas.

The crux of the long-delayed bill, singularly pushed by Democrats in a closely divided Congress, is to use incentives to spur investors to accelerate the expansion of clean energy such as wind and solar power, speeding the transition away from the oil, coal and gas that largely cause climate change.

The United States has put the most heat-trapping gases into the air, burning more inexpensive dirty fuels than any other country. But the nearly $375 billion in climate incentives in the Inflation Reduction Act are designed to make the already plummeting costs of renewable energy substantially lower at home, on the highways and in the factory. Together these could help shrink U.S. carbon emissions by about two-fifths by 2030 and should chop emissions from electricity by as much as 80%.

Experts say it isn’t enough, but it’s a big start.

“This legislation is a true game-changer. It will create jobs, lower costs, increase U.S. competitiveness, reduce air pollution,” said former Vice President Al Gore, who held his first global warming hearing 40 years ago. …read more

Source:: The Denver Post

Frenemies reunited: Gavin Newsom names ex-LA Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa to new post

By MICHAEL R. BLOOD | Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Thursday appointed one-time nemesis and rival Antonio Villaraigosa, the former Los Angeles mayor, to a new post helping steer a gusher of federal dollars to road, port and transit projects.

These days, the two are more friends than frenemies.

Newsom announced that Villaraigosa would assume the post of “infrastructure czar,” an advisory position in which he would be pursuing billions of federal dollars and helping pair it with needs in the state.

“Money is not our problem anymore,” the governor said, referring to a recently enacted $1 trillion federal infrastructure deal that promises to send billions for improvements to the nation’s most populous state.

California has to “go out and get it,” Newsom added, which is the charge Villaraigosa has in the new post.

Villaraigosa said: “We got to build. We got to invest. And that’s what this is all about.”

The appointment marks the latest chapter in a long-running relationship that has veered from open hostility to, now, playing for the same team.

Newsom was mayor of San Francisco when Villaraigosa was in charge of City Hall in Los Angeles, a time when each was often looking to outshine — if not rattle or embarrass — the other. The two Democrats later faced off in a 2018 primary race for governor, a contest won by Newsom that turned so nasty the two later made a public appearance together to dispel any notion of lasting enmity.

As mayor in L.A., Villaraigosa was credited with kicking off a transit buildup that continues today. Newsom said he would bring extensive know-how in capturing federal dollars and getting shovels in the ground.

Technically, Villaraigosa will not be a state employee. This position is funded through a partnership with California Forward, a nonprofit that seeks to promote job growth …read more

Source:: Los Angeles Daily News

The site of the US’s first major World War II offensive in the Pacific is the scene of new struggle with China

US Navy transport ship USS President Adams, its decks crowded with troops, before the invasion of Guadalcanal, August 4, 1942.

Eighty years ago, Allied troops stormed the beaches of Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands.
It was the first Allied offensive in the Pacific, and it began to roll back the Japanese advance.
The Solomons are now the site of another competition between the US and its allies and China.

After a massive air and naval bombardment early on August 7, 1942, some 11,000 US Marines stormed the islands of Guadalcanal, Tulagi, and Florida in the southern part of the Solomon Islands.

Coming exactly eight months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the landings were the first Allied offensive action of the Pacific theater.

The focus was on Guadalcanal, where the Japanese had begun constructing an airfield a month earlier. If completed, it would have directly threatened Australia and its supply lines and set the stage for further Japanese advances.

What followed was a brutal six-month slog involving every US military branch, including the Coast Guard. More than 60,000 US and 31,000 Japanese troops would fight in three major land engagements, seven naval battles, and near constant aerial bombardments and dogfights.

The first offensive
A Japanese heavy cruiser after being bombed by US aircraft during the Battle of Midway in June 1942.

By July 1942, the situation in the Pacific had begun to stabilize.

Japan’s seemingly unstoppable advance toward Australia had been checked at the Battle of the Coral Sea in May, and a month later the Japanese lost four fleet carriers, some 250 aircraft, and over 3,000 sailors and pilots at the Battle of Midway.

Both battles were milestones in the war and left the Japanese military essentially unable to mount further large-scale offensives.

In those battles and virtually every other engagement in …read more

Source:: Businessinsider

Armed man killed after trying to breach FBI office, standoff

CINCINNATI (AP) — An armed man who tried to breach the FBI’s Cincinnati office was shot and killed by police after he fled the scene, leading to an hourlong standoff Thursday afternoon, the Ohio Highway State Patrol said.

The man, who has not been identified, was shot after he raised a gun toward police at around 3 p.m., said Lt. Nathan Dennis, a patrol spokesperson.

Officials said the man was wearing body armor and was chased onto a highway, then had abandoned his car on nearby country roads bordered by woods and farm fields just off I-71, about 45 miles (72 kilometers) northeast of Cincinnati.

The confrontation came as officials warned of an increase in threats against federal agents in the days following a search of former President Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida.

Federal officials said the man “attempted to breach” the visitor’s screening area at the FBI office and fled when agents confronted him. After fleeing onto Interstate 71, he was spotted by a trooper and fired shots as the trooper pursued him, said Lt. Nathan Dennis, a Ohio State Highway Patrol spokesperson.

The suspect left the interstate north of Cincinnati and abandoned his car on rural roads, where he exchanged gunfire with police. The man has “unknown injuries,” but no one else was hurt, the patrol said.

State highway workers blocked off roads leading to the scene as a helicopter flew over the area. Officials locked down a mile radius near the interstate and urged residents and business owners to lock doors and stay inside. The interstate has been reopened.

There have been growing threats in recent days against FBI agents and offices across the country since federal agents executed a search warrant at Mar-a-Lago. On Gab, a social media site popular with white supremacists and antisemites, users have warned they are preparing for …read more

Source:: The Denver Post

Garland asks court to unseal warrant for Mar-a-Lago search

By ERIC TUCKER and MICHAEL BALSAMO

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department is asking a federal court to unseal the warrant the FBI used to search the Mar-a-Lago estate of former President Donald Trump, Attorney General Merrick Garland said Thursday, acknowledging extraordinary public interest in the case about classified records.

The request is striking because such documents traditionally remain sealed during a pending investigation. But the Justice Department appeared to recognize that its silence since the search had created a vacuum for bitter verbal attacks by Trump and his allies, and that the public was entitled to the FBI’s side about what prompted Monday’s action at the former president’s home.

“The public’s clear and powerful interest in understanding what occurred under these circumstances weighs heavily in favor of unsealing,” said a motion filed in federal court in Florida on Thursday.

Should the warrant be released — the request is now with the judge, and Trump can object — it could disclose unflattering information about the former president and about FBI scrutiny of his handling of sensitive government documents right as he prepares for another run for the White House. During his successful 2016 campaign, he pointed frequently to an FBI investigation into his Democratic opponent, Hillary Clinton, over whether she mishandled classified information.

It’s unclear at this point how much information would be included in the documents, if made public, or if they would encompass an FBI affidavit that would presumably lay out a detailed factual basis for the search. The department specifically requested the unsealing of the warrant as well as a property receipt listing the items that were seized, along with two unspecified attachments.

To obtain a search warrant, federal authorities must prove to a judge that probable cause exists to believe that a crime was committed. Garland said he personally approved the warrant, …read more

Source:: The Denver Post

Bears coach Matt Eberflus merely middle man as Ryan Poles, Roquan Smith spar

Eberflus is is in his first season as an NFL head coach.

AP Photos

For the first time since the Bears cleaned house, dysfunction is spilling out of the organization and into the public.

As general manager Ryan Poles’ negotiations with star linebacker Roquan Smith have erupted into the player requesting a trade and the team pondering whether to start fining him, coach Matt Eberflus swatted helplessly at a swarm of questions about what exactly is going on here.

Funny how no matter who happens to be running Halas Hall in a given decade, there’s never a straight answer for that.

Smith was at practice, but wouldn’t practice.

It’s unexcused, but it’s also unclear what consequence there is for it.

It’s flagrant defiance of his coach, but Eberflus can’t really do anything about it.

“I just think that you go about your business,” he said.

That’s not possible. Smith is the business.

This team has three young players who indisputably should be part of its future: Smith, cornerback Jaylon Johnson and wide receiver Darnell Mooney. Smith is essential to everything Eberflus wants to establish. He’s a still-rising star at age 25 and has the versatility every team craves at the position; his backup is Matt Adams, who logged exactly one defensive snap over the 2020 and ’21 seasons combined.

That’s a big part of why Smith’s power play is working. The Bears need him.

So until Poles fixes this, it sounds like Eberflus is left in an untenable position. His best player is disregarding the standards that are at the core of Eberflus’ philosophy, but nothing’s changing. Somehow it’s going to be business as usual?

“I’m not saying that, I’m not …read more

Source:: Chicago Sun Times

THE PAYMENTS ECOSYSTEM: The biggest shifts and trends driving short- and long-term growth and shaping the future of the industry

This is a preview of The Payments Ecosystem research report from Insider Intelligence.
Purchase this report.
Insider Intelligence offers even more consumer coverage with Payments & Commerce Pro. Subscribe today to receive industry-changing payments and commerce news and analysis to your inbox.

The power dynamics in the payments industry are changing as businesses and consumers shift dollars from cash and checks to digital payment methods. Cards dominate the in-store retail channel, but mobile wallets like Apple Pay are seeing a rapid uptick in usage.

At the same time, e-commerce will chip away at brick-and-mortar retail as smartphones attract a rising share of digital shopping. Digital peer-to-peer (P2P) apps are supplanting cash in the day-to-day lives of users across generations as they become more appealing and useful than ever.

And change is trickling down into bigger industries long-dominated by cash and check, like remittances and business-to-business payments.

In response, providers are scrambling for market share. Skyrocketing consolidation that creates mega-giants is forcing providers to diversify in search of new volume.

New entrants, especially from big tech, are threatening the leads of giants. And as payments become increasingly effortless, new types of fraud are threatening data security and privacy. While demand for richer payments offerings is creating opportunities across the space, it’s also leaving the industry in search of ways to adapt to change that is putting trillions in volume and billions in revenue up for grabs.

In this report, Insider Intelligence examines the payments ecosystem today, its growth drivers, and where the industry is headed. It begins by tracing the path of an in-store card payment from processing to settlement across the key stakeholders. That process is central to understanding payments, and has changed slowly in the face of disruption.

The report also forecasts growth and defines drivers for key digital payment types through 2024. …read more

Source:: Businessinsider

4 lingering misconceptions about the FBI raid on Trump’s Mar-a-Lago

Former US President Donald Trump leaves Trump Tower to meet with New York Attorney General Letitia James for a civil investigation on August 10, 2022 in New York City.

There are lots of unanswered questions about the FBI search of Mar-a-Lago. 

Attorney General Merrick Garland provided a peek into the underlying search warrant on Thursday. 
Trump and his allies are filling in the blanks with wild speculation and baseless allegations. 

The stunning government-sanctioned sweep of Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate has sparked ideological meltdowns galore this week, with the embattled former presidents and MAGA loyalists railing against federal law enforcement officials they suspect of trying to knock the twice-impeached GOP leader out of contention from running again in 2024.  

Attorney General Merrick Garland broke his silence about the raid on Thursday, confirming during a press conference that he’d personally signed off on the warrant and that he’d filed a motion to unseal the hotly-disputed document mostly because Trump had made a big deal about it. 

Garland also defended the agents who conducted the search, calling them “patriotic public servants.” 

That hasn’t stopped Trump supporters from crying “political witch hunt,” questioning the credibility of law enforcement or flooding the internet with unfounded allegations. 

Here are the biggest misconceptions (so far) floating around about what went down in Palm Beach, Florida. 

FBI planted evidence

Trump, his attorneys, and Fox News host Jesse Waters put out there that perhaps federal agents weren’t collecting evidence so much as placing it on Trump’s property. 

Waters and Trump attorney Alina Habba pushed that narrative Tuesday, saying the FBI “probably” planted evidence while on site and expressing concern that it might have happened, respectively. 

Trump took the ball and ran with it on Truth Social, telling his devotees the search was conducted “without any witnesses to see what they …read more

Source:: Businessinsider

Denver breaks a record-high temperature hitting 98 degrees

Denver broke a record-high temperature for the date today when it hit 98 degrees, according to the National Weather Service.

The previous record-high temperature, 97 degrees, for Aug. 11 was set in 2020, the weather service said.

The heat will continue on Friday in Denver with a forecast high temperature of 96 degrees. High temperatures — mid 90s — in the metro area will remain in the forecast through the weekend, with a bit of a cool down expected on Monday when the high temp will top out at about 87 degrees in Denver.

Denver airport has reached 98F, which sets a new daily record high. #COwx pic.twitter.com/ybi7rVsJS8

— NWS Boulder (@NWSBoulder) August 11, 2022

…read more

Source:: The Denver Post

Big climate bill: Major new spending to spur green energy

By SETH BORENSTEIN, MATTHEW DALY and MICHAEL PHILLIS

WASHINGTON (AP) — After decades of inaction in the face of escalating natural disasters and sustained global warming, Congress hopes to make clean energy so cheap in all aspects of life that it’s nearly irresistible. The House is poised to pass a transformative bill Friday that would provide the most spending to fight climate change by any one nation ever in a single push.

Friday’s anticipated action comes 34 years after a top scientist grabbed headlines warning Congress about the dangers of global warming. In the decades since, there have been 308 weather disasters that have each cost the nation at least $1 billion, the record for the hottest year has been broken 10 times and wildfires have burned an area larger than Texas.

The crux of the long-delayed bill, singularly pushed by Democrats in a closely divided Congress, is to use incentives to spur investors to accelerate the expansion of clean energy such as wind and solar power, speeding the transition away from the oil, coal and gas that largely cause climate change.

The United States has put the most heat-trapping gases into the air, burning more inexpensive dirty fuels than any other country. But the nearly $375 billion in climate incentives in the Inflation Reduction Act are designed to make the already plummeting costs of renewable energy substantially lower at home, on the highways and in the factory. Together these could help shrink U.S. carbon emissions by about two-fifths by 2030 and should chop emissions from electricity by as much as 80%.

Experts say it isn’t enough, but it’s a big start.

“This legislation is a true game-changer. It will create jobs, lower costs, increase U.S. competitiveness, reduce air pollution,” said former Vice President Al Gore, who held his first global warming hearing 40 years ago. …read more

Source:: The Denver Post

Risk of Chernobyl-style disaster as fighting intensifies around nuclear plant

(FILES) In this file photo taken on May 1, 2022, A Russian serviceman patrols the territory of the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Station in Energodar. - Kyiv on August 8, 2022, called for the establishment of a demilitarised zone around the nuclear power station in east Ukraine, where recent fighting with Russian forces has raised fears of a nuclear accident. The Kremlin on August 8, 2022, accused Ukrainian forces of firing on the Zaporizhzhia atomic power plant, warning of potential
Russian troops have controlled the plant for months but fighting continues in the region (Picture: AFP)

Russian troops have controlled the plant for months but fighting continues in the region (Picture: AFP)

Fears are mounting that Europe could be on the brink of a nuclear disaster amid intensifying fighting around the continent’s biggest atomic plant.

Shells hit buildings close to the Zaporizhzhia power station today as Ukrainian and Russian soldiers struggle for control of the strategically important area.

Kyiv said the site was hit by explosives fired by invaders five times, including near a radioactive material storage unit.

The Russian defence ministry claimed Ukrainian troops were to blame and that they had damaged a thermal power plant and part of the cooling system.

Kremlin soldiers have occupied the area since March but Ukrainian technicians continue to operate the plant itself, effectively being held at gunpoint.

The United Nations has made an urgent plea for a ceasefire zone to be established around the station to prevent the risk of nuclear catastrophe. 

An emergency meeting of the Security Council was convened in New York to discuss the deteriorating situation today. 

Ukraine has accused Russia of using the base as a shield to launch attacks from (Picture: Reuters)

Ukraine’s president Volodymyr Zelensky accused Russia of using the nuclear power plant ‘to threaten the entire world’.

UN chief Antonio Guterres said: ‘The facility must not be used as part of any military operation. 

‘Instead, urgent agreement is needed at a technical level on a safe perimeter of demilitarization to ensure the safety of the area.’

Experts from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) have been pushing for an agreement between the two warring sides so they can carry out an inspection.

An image taken earlier today showed smoke rising the plant earlier but authorities said it was a grass fire caused by a shell away from radioactive materials

The watchdog has previously …read more

Source:: Metro News

Citi Double Cash card review: One of the best no-annual-fee credit cards, now with a $200 welcome bonus for a limited time

Insider’s experts choose the best products and services to help make smart decisions with your money (here’s how). In some cases, we receive a commission from our our partners, however, our opinions are our own. Terms apply to offers listed on this page.

Getting 2% back (1 point per dollar at the time of purchase and 1 point per dollar when you pay your bill) without an annual fee is an excellent deal. And because the Citi® Double Cash Card has added a rare welcome bonus of Citi® Double Cash Card for a limited time, it’s an even better value.

Review: Is the Citi Double Cash the best credit card for you?

While there are many cash-back credit cards that give you 1.5% back on your spending without an annual fee, few surpass that earning threshold. That’s why the Citi® Double Cash Card is so exceptional.

With the Citi® Double Cash Card, you’ll earn 2 points per dollar (1 point per dollar when you make a purchase, and 1 point per dollar when you pay it off) on all purchases, with no limit to what you can earn. It’s an ideal card for those who want a solid rewards-earning rate without having to keep track of bonus categories or spending caps.

The Citi® Double Cash Card almost never offers a welcome bonus, but right now, it’s offering Citi® Double Cash Card. If you’ve been on the fence about this card, now’s the time to apply.

Because it has no annual fee, the Citi® Double Cash Card is a great option as a long-term “keeper card” — both for its strong earning and because your average account age is a factor in determining your credit score. The Citi® Double Cash Card offers a Citi® Double Cash Card, then a 13.99% …read more

Source:: Businessinsider

5 ways to troubleshoot if your phone can’t connect to Google Voice

If you can’t connect to Google Voice on your phone, check your internet connection and make sure the app isn’t set to “Do not disturb.”
If you recently changed phones, you might need to redirect Google Voice to your new number. 
Here are five ways to troubleshoot when Google Voice isn’t connecting to your phone.

Google Voice is one of the search giant’s hidden gems — a Voice Over IP (VoIP) service that gives your phone access to a (mostly) free second phone number which you can use as a business line or second personal number. Unfortunately, Google Voice is no stranger to connection issues. If you can’t get Google Voice to work on your iPhone or Android phone, here are five ways to troubleshoot the problem and get the service up and running. 

Check your internet connection

If you usually have no trouble with Google Voice but it’s currently not connecting properly, the first thing you should check is your internet connection. Google Voice will work over both a cellular connection and Wi-Fi, but if you have neither, you won’t be able to connect. Check the status bar at the top of your phone screen to see if you have a solid signal. If in doubt, swipe down from the top of the screen to see the Control Center or shortcuts panel, then toggle Airplane mode and Wi-Fi to refresh your connections. 

Turn WiFi off and on again to see if that solves your Google Voice connection problem.

Make sure you’re not in ‘Do not disturb’ mode

You probably know that your phone’s “Do not disturb” mode can silence your phone to give you a break from incoming calls, texts, and notifications. But Google Voice has its own Do not disturb setting, and if it’s enabled, you won’t …read more

Source:: Businessinsider

John Bolton says he’s ’embarrassed’ that an Iranian Revolutionary Guard member offered the ‘low price’ of just $300,000 to assassinate him

Former US National Security Advisor John Bolton in Minsk, Belarus on August 29, 2019.

The DOJ announced Wednesday that John Bolton was the target of an assassination plot.
Bolton says he was “embarrassed” by the “low price” that the Iranian official offered for his murder.
While Shahram Poursafi offered just $300,000 for Bolton, they offered $1 million for Mike Pompeo.

Former National Security Advisor John Bolton said on Wednesday that he was “embarrassed” that an Iranian military official only offered $300,000 for his assassination.

The Department of Justice announced on Wednesday that Shahram Poursafi, a member of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), had offered the bounty “likely in retaliation” for the January 2020 killing of Qasem Soleimani, the commander of the IRGC’s Quds Force and a powerful figure within the country.

Bolton served under former President Donald Trump before being fired in September 2019.

“Well, I was embarrassed at the low price. I thought it would have been higher,” he quipped in an appearance on CNN Wednesday evening. “Maybe it was an exchange rate problem or something.”

He went on to say that he had “long had a general understanding of what the threat was,” but was not aware of the specifics of the plot.

He also indicated that he was not aware of another plot against former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo — who had a much higher bounty of $1 million for his murder — but said he wasn’t surprised.

“I think there are a substantial number of people who are vulnerable to these Iranian efforts,” he said.

 

Read the original article on Business Insider

…read more

Source:: Businessinsider